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Street Work


CSF Street Work initiatives represent the most critical stage of our interventions with the street youth in Mwanza. These early interventions help build trust and awareness with the youth, enabling to vision a life beyond the street.

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Street Work


CSF Street Work initiatives represent the most critical stage of our interventions with the street youth in Mwanza. These early interventions help build trust and awareness with the youth, enabling to vision a life beyond the street.

The Cheka sana foundation street work programmes represent a hugely important initial interaction with the individuals we are aiming to help. These children do not give their trust easily and they can be hard to engage with. That's why it is crucial that our programmes run consistently and cohesively, so our presence is always felt, and the children know that we are on their side.


Currently our Street Work initiatives fall into three distinct categories - social outreach for young boys, street born for girls and young women at risk in the sex trade and street skills football meetings for boys and girls alike.

Each initiative has very distinct outcomes, be that repatriation, education and empowerment or social development and confidence building. In working with individuals on the street we follow a very clear solutions focussed approach wherein the outcomes are mutually agreed and worked to in very practical terms.

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Outreach


CRW street outreach represent a critical early intervention in the lives of children on the street and comprise; advice on health issues and cleanliness; help in dealing with authorities if the need arises; sports activities and where possible sign-posting to additional services for repatriation.

Outreach


CRW street outreach represent a critical early intervention in the lives of children on the street and comprise; advice on health issues and cleanliness; help in dealing with authorities if the need arises; sports activities and where possible sign-posting to additional services for repatriation.

 

Street outreach and Social Work


Our outreach team work with boys who are living and working on the streets of Mwanza with the aim to successfully reunify 20 boys each year. Our team carry this work out by firstly conducting street visits to build up a meaningful, trusted relationship with these children.

Our intervention gives a real break from the 'everyday' for these boys. Where they would normally be begging, searching for recyclables and charcoal or cleaning buses to get enough reward for food, we take them away from this norm. We bring them to the lake for cleanliness sessions, giving them a healthy breakfast, helping with their education and giving them important advice for their current life situation. Our regular contact with these children is absolutely critical in developing an on-going dialogue to ensure that appropriate advice and actions are taken for the individual. 

If the child is then keen to work with our team and to look at moving away from the streets, then the process of them entering a transitional residential centre will begin - though we currently don't have a boys centre, we are still able to help individuals in this regard using sister organisations as a temporary measure. 


When the time is right...

Depending on the child’s situation, our team will carry out home visits with the child which include implementing and holding family sessions.

These visits mean that we can assess the safety of each individual child within the family unit, as well as additional support that may be needed, such as family support packages and business grants. Once the child is reunified, the reintegration process and family work continues through regular monitoring and follow up visits.

As with our work at Cheka Sana, our social workers work to ensure that each child has the opportunity to be listened to, to deal with traumatic experiences, to talk about their family situations and to gradually start thinking about their future.

Each child’s case manager can best assess when and which processes are necessary to place the child to a safe home whether it is with immediate or extended family members or whether another option has to be sought such as longer term residential care.

 
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The Boys


Real boys,
real lives,
real dangers
– a real need.

The Boys


Real boys,
real lives,
real dangers
– a real need.

Meet some of the boys living on the street in Mwanza today. These boys are all from the Buzuruga bus station, and make their money by cleaning buses, and scouring around for recyclables and charcoal to sell back to the street vendors.


John

Age 15

John was forced onto the the street as a result of family breakdown. His brother and three sisters have remained with their mother, however the family aren't wealthy enough to support them all. Having been on the street for nearly a year, John is an established member of the Buzuruga group, working hard cleaning buses, collecting plastic bottles and charcoal for subsistence.

John would like to be able to return home, though staying on the street is an easier option - he struggles to get enough money for the transport to and from his mother.

His future desire is to become a businessman and he has found our outreach a useful tool in helping him visualise this goal. John is a very creative individual and his art sessions with us have really brought him out of his shell.


james

James is a bit of an elusive character and highly mobile in his existence. He spends the majority of his time with the Buzuruga boys, but also moves into the centre of Mwanza for periods. Having turned to the streets as a result of being beaten and kicked out by his father, James is now a habituated street child having lived this way for three years.

However, he is a very intelligent little boy who obviously did well at school, speaking and writing English. His dream is to become a pilot, somethings which comes out regularly in our con stations and art sessions with him. Sadly we've not seen him for a while, so we can only hope he's safe and sound. James is, to us, the perfect example of why we need a residential facility where such bright and focussed young boys could develop their talents in a safe and secure environment.


Mwita

Mwita would like to become a doctor when he's older. He's been part of the Buzuruga boys group for about a year now, having left home after a break up and not being able to see eye to eye with his step father.

Mwita has made quite a steady existence for himself on the street, begging and collecting recyclables for food, though he would like to return home one day to be with his brothers and sisters. He is very aware of the dangers of living on the street, and knows that the best place for him is home.


All our current boys are somewhat mobile, so we may not see the same group from week to week which makes planning and implementing meaningful support very difficult indeed. Naturally we are focussing our efforts in getting a centre for them so we can really help them in the same way we can for the girls at Cheka Sana. If you would like to help us in this endeavour, please find out how you can help here.

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Street Born


Street Born is aimed at young women and mothers who are currently working within the sex industry. Our approach is to empower the individuals within their pre-existing group structure. This gives CRW a crucial window of opportunity to inform and educate the group with the aim of liberating them from exploitation.

Street Born


Street Born is aimed at young women and mothers who are currently working within the sex industry. Our approach is to empower the individuals within their pre-existing group structure. This gives CRW a crucial window of opportunity to inform and educate the group with the aim of liberating them from exploitation.

 

Street Born


The team responsible for this project work with girls and young mothers who are involved in sexual exploitation and / or the street. We focus our work in working with the girls in small 'association groups'.

The idea of the association group is to take an existing social group and, using its inherent structure, develop a forward thinking and progressive focus, leading to individuals being capable to support themselves within their own social network. The association model empowers the youth to develop their own justified rules and meetings, to offer support and advice to peers, while working together to support each other in the development stages of the steps towards economic stability for the group and as individuals. Groups therefore are provided with vocational training and grant support to start a business as a route to escaping exploitation. 

In addition to this we focus on providing life skills sessions to the girls in these groups, including baby care and parenting skills, health care, hygiene and reproductive health and provide access to family planning advice, HIV support and therapeutic support.

Through the establishment of these groups we also then start working closely with some individual girls who show the need of additional support. Through this additional support we work on an individual basis with the girls to help them to deal with their traumas and troubles, in addition to building their relationship and interaction with their children.